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FAQ of New Zealand

faq (1)

If you are planning to study in New Zealand then you will have many questions in mind before coming to the decision. To help you out, the following are the list of frequently asked questions and answers to them:

  • How do I choose a school/institution?
  • How do I travel around new Zealand?
  • What is the lifestyle like in New Zealand?
  • What student discounts are available?
  • What types of accommodations are available?
  • How much money can I bring?
  • Are scholarships available?
  • Can I stay in New Zealand after I’ve finished studying?

How do I choose a school/institution?
Before you enroll at a Private Training Establishment (including English language schools), check that it’s registered with the New Zealand Qualifications Authority, that its programme is approved and that the organization is accredited.

You can do that at:
www.nzqa.govt.newzealand/studying-in-new-zealand/tertiaryeducation/choosing-an-educational-provider/
(Institutes of technology and polytechnics, universities and wānanga are set up separately by government legislation and follow different rules.)
Registration with NZQA ensures that the school provides a sound and stable learning environment.
NZQA programme approval confirms that a programme is based on clear and consistent aims, content, outcomes and assessment practices which lead to a recognised qualification.

An NZQA accreditation confirms that the organisation can deliver an approved programme.
You should also check with NZQA to see if the school has had an external evaluation and review (EER) recently. EER is a periodic evaluation of a tertiary education organisation. It provides an independent judgement of the organisation’s educational performance and capability in self-assessment.

Finally, you should check that your school has signed up to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students.

How do I travel around New Zealand?
With so many things to do and spectacular places to see, you’ll want to do as much exploring as your time away from study allows.
Travelling around New Zealand is easy. For holidays, most people drive and self-drive rentals are easily available, or you can take one of the bus and coach services that connect most centres.
The road network covers the whole country, although you may find our roads are more narrow and windy than you’re used to. The North and South Island road systems are linked by the Interislander and Bluebridge car and passenger ferries, a 2½ hour ferry trip taking in the picturesque Marlborough sounds.
Railways are limited, although there are some services between main centres which offer a great way to see some of New Zealand’s most spectacular scenery.
New Zealanders frequently fly. Airports make every part of the country accessible, from Kaitaia Airport in the far north to Ryan’s Creek Aerodrome on Stewart Island. One way domestic air travel tickets between the main centres can cost as little as NZ$59.

What is the lifestyle like in New Zealand?
Life in New Zealand is safe and secure, and we enjoy one of the most well-balanced lifestyles in the world.
In fact, when the Economist Intelligence Unit measured which countries provide the best opportunities for a healthy, safe and prosperous life, New Zealand was in its top ten best places to be born in 2013.
New Zealanders are friendly and typically welcoming to newcomers. We’re great international travellers ourselves, and nearly a quarter of us were born outside New Zealand. Around 10% of New Zealanders are of Asian ethnic origin.
That all adds up to a warm welcome. In fact, nine out of ten migrants find that the welcome they receive when they first arrive meets or exceeds their expectations, according to a recent Immigration New Zealand survey.
International students enjoy the added support and protection provided by our Code of Practice for the care of students. The Code, the world’s first, sets standards for how educational institutions must support international students in and out of the classroom.
Every educational institution must sign up to the Code of Practice before they can accept international students. As part of that, they must have staff on hand who are experienced in helping international students solve any problems and settle into their new home. The Code also ensures that the financial investment in their education is protected.You’ll have plenty of living options. From apartments in the city to homestays in the countryside, you’ll find something that suits you and your study needs.

What student discounts are available?faq-main
When you get your New Zealand student ID card, you’ll benefit from many student discounts available in the area you choose to live. There’s more information at www.studyzone.co.nz/life/discounts.php
ISIC cards (International Student Identity Cards) are available for NZ$25. They give you discounts on getting around New Zealand, accommodation and activities and more. Find out more at www.isiccard.co.nz/
You can also buy student discount cards from various companies for around $20 – check out StudentCard and Training Card at www.studentcard.co.nz/

What types of accommodations are available?
You’ll have plenty of living options. From apartments in the city to home stays in the countryside, you’ll find something that suits you and your study needs.
A homestay (or private board)
With a homestay you live with a New Zealand family in their home, usually in a fully furnished room of your own. They’ll provide you with meals and help you to settle in to day-to-day life in New Zealand.
A homestay is a great way to get to know some friendly New Zealanders, develop your English skills and get a close-up look at New Zealand’s way of life and culture.

Halls of residence (or hostel)
This is a good choice if you’d like to meet new people and live in a secure, safe place. Usually just a walk away from campus, halls of residence offer fully furnished single or twin-share rooms with a shared dining hall, lounge and laundry. Meals are often included and you’ll probably find a lively programme of sport and other fun activities on offer. A number of the larger institutions also provide private hostels that run in a similar way, and some have self-contained apartments (which we call ‘flats’). A home stay (or private board) With a home stay you live with a New Zealand family in their home, usually in a fully furnished room of your own. They’ll provide you with meals and help you to settle in to day-to-day life in New Zealand. A homestay is a great way to get to know some friendly New Zealanders, develop your English skills and get a close-up look at New Zealand’s way of life and culture.

Flatting/independent accommodation
Flats range from one-bedroom apartments to four- or five-bedroom homes, and can be found just about anywhere – close to cities and campuses or further out in the surrounding suburbs, where you’re more likely to find gardens and car-parking space.

How much does it cost to live in New Zealand?
Comparing living costs is hard. It depends on which country you come from, and what part. It also depends on which part of New Zealand you’re coming to. As is probably the case in your country, big cities are more expensive places to live in than the smaller centres.
But overall, the costs of living here are comparable to other western-style OECD countries. Some things will cost less; others (particularly items that have had to be imported from long distances) will cost more.

Are scholarships available?
A number of scholarships are available to help international students fund their tertiary studies in New Zealand, at undergraduate, graduate and doctoral levels.
They are available from a wide range of sources including the New Zealand government, the educational institutions themselves, foreign governments, philanthropic organizations and private sources.